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Chapter 2: Build a Solid Foundation – The Complete Guide to Google Interview Preparation

This is the second chapter for our <The Complete Guide to Google Interview Preparation> series. If you pay attention to a lot of job requirements, you usually see things like “have a solid computer science foundation”. What does that actually mean?

Apparently, it doesn’t mean you have a computer science degree, nor does it mean you have written a lot of code. in reality, a solid computer science foundation means having a clear understanding of basic knowledge.

In this chapter, I’d like to delve into this topic and give you practical tips on how to build a solid foundation. I would say this is the entry point to Google interview preparation, but at the same time, it’s the most important step.

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Chapter 1: Get an Interview with Google – The Complete Guide to Google Interview Preparation

Google receives over 1 million resumes a year and only a few people got the chance to take an interview. In other words, most people didn’t fail Google interviews but failed to get an interview.

When talking about Google interview preparation, most people will focus on coding questions and try to practice every single question on Leetcode. However, more than 90% of them didn’t get a chance to test it.

Even if you are not fully prepared, taking the interview means you still have a chance. In this chapter, I’d like to give a lot of practical suggestions on how to get an interview with Google. Most techniques also work for other companies.

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Uber Interview Questions – Longest Increasing Subarray

This week, I’m going to talk about the longest increasing subarray problem. You can find more posts like this at Uber Interview Questions.

Also, this question is similar to Subarray With Given Sum. If you have read our previous post, I hope you can solve this problem easily.

In this post, I’m going to cover topics like “sliding window”, dynamic programming, time/space complexity and so on.

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Uber Interview Questions – Arrange Given Numbers To Form The Biggest Number Possible

This week, I’m going to discuss the question – arrange given numbers to form the biggest number possible. Like our previous posts about Uber interview questions, I’m focusing more about the analysis process than the final solution.

The idea is not to give our readers the answer/code immediately. Instead, I’d like to guide you through the whole analysis process. At the end, I hope you can be equipped everything you need to solve similar questions.

Here we go.
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Uber Interview Questions – Search an Element in a Sorted and Rotated Array

In this post, we will talk about rotated array binary search problem. Three major things are discussed: First of all, instead of providing the solution, we’ll cover how to analyze the question and how to come up with the right idea. Second, it’s not easy to write the bug-free solution for this problem and we’ll talk about some tips and hacks. Last, like our other posts, common techniques are summarized at the end of the post so that you can use similar tools to solve other coding interview questions.

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Uber Interview Questions – Permutations of Parentheses

We’ve received a lot of feedback from our previous posts. Some readers pointed out bugs in the code and hopefully we’ve fixed all of them. Also, a lot of people are asking for more posts about dynamic programming/recursion. That’s why this week we’d like to talk about the question – permutations of parentheses.

Many people are afraid of this topic because it can be hard to come up with the solution if you haven’t practiced enough. On the flip side, the good news is that just because this topic is relatively difficult, the question cannot be too hard in a coding interview (otherwise, no one could solve it).

This week, we’ll continue to discuss this topic with a Uber interview question, but the analysis/solution is slightly different.

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Uber Interview Questions – Maximum Sum of Non-adjacent Elements

As you may know, one of our blog’s current focuses is on Uber interview questions. Their questions are usually representative and you can expect exactly the same kind of questions from other top companies like Google, Facebook, Airbnb, etc.. In addition, we only cover questions that were asked recently. This week, the question is maximum sum of non-adjacent elements. It’s of medium difficulty, you may expect to have it as the second question in an on-site interview. We are going to cover topics including array, recursion/dynamic programming, algorithm efficiency and so on so forth.

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Uber Interview Questions – Move Zeroes

As we’ve emphasized many times, most people overestimate the difficulty of Uber/Google/Facebook interview questions and underestimate the importance of bug-free code.

At the end of the day, many people have complained that the questions were simpler than expected, but they didn’t manage to write clean code. Especially when someone is looking over your shoulder, people tend to be nervous.

In our recent posts like this, I really want to discuss more fundamental questions, but get your code correct. This week, we’ll discuss a Uber interview question – move zeroes. This question is usually asked in phone screens or as the first question in on-site interviews. It’s for sure that you’ll write down the solid code and you get no chance if your code is buggy or inefficient.

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